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Posted & filed under Children's Book Reviews

In 1349, rumours about who is to blame for the bubonic plague are spreading as fast as the disease. Without a sewage system and long before people knew that germs cause disease, the townspeople of Strasbourg blame the Jewish people. Having fallen in love with a Christian girl named Elena, seventeen-year-old Natan overhears a plot to implicate his people on his way back from a secret rendezvous. When Natan is suddenly killed at the hands of the men trying to frame the Jews, his consciousness is mysteriously transferred into another man’s body. As the only witness to this deceit, Natan must convince the city’s Ammeister (head of city council) and Elena that appearances can be deceiving.

Known for historical YA fiction works such as Kanada and The Last Song, author Eva Wiseman delves into this lesser known historical event of a mass execution of Jewish people in Another Me. Despite his challenging new appearance as a Christian draper’s apprentice, Natan is adamant about protecting his family and community. With Elena’s help, he struggles to fight back against the mounting prejudice, trying his best to expose the truth to those in power before fatal decisions are made.

Tension mounts as Wiseman sets the stage with conflicting elements – an historical event that cannot be changed, and a love that cannot endure. This sense of inescapable fate drives a doomed and sorrowful tale, reminding readers that sometimes in the face of inalterable situations all we have are our good intentions and actions.

  • Another Me

    By Eva Wiseman, Published by Tundra Books, Penguin Random House of Canada
    • ISBN 13: 978-1-770-497-161
Amy Mathers
An avid promoter of Canadian teen fiction, Amy Mathers completed the Marathon of Books in 2014. The money she raised allowed the Canadian Children’s Book Centre to fund the Amy Mathers Teen Book Award. She also reviews for the Canadian Children’s Book News and writes a monthly article for the CCBC e-newsletter.